Welcome to GeekTech’s daily roundup of the day, covering news we weren’t able to give the full-story treatment in bite-sized chunks. GeekBytes is all over cool hacks today, so check out some interesting phone tinkering news, plus how to make a small LED video wall or “stroboscope” with Arduino.

It’s November 22, 2011. Let’s look at the fun stuff we have today.

Make Yourself A Mini Times Square

Want to light up your house in an interesting way? Try building a mini RGB LED Video Wall. The wall by Pix 6T4 is covered in 160 LEDs on a five meter LED strip cut into a 16 by 10 display. The setup is controlled by a Netduino, an Arduino-based microcontroller designed specifically for connecting to fun applications such as Twitter. The result? A very mesmerizing and colorful display. Check out the video to see the LED wall in action:

HTC Gifts Developers With Kernel Source Code

Despite accusations that it’s a little slow on releasing source code to developers, HTC Dev has finally pushed out the kernel source code for a number of its phones, allowing groups such as the XDA Developers to tinker away. Models up for developer modding include the Rezound, Amaze, Explorer, and Desire S. To check out all the resources, visit HTC Dev’s website and pick if you want to work on Android or Windows Phone 7 devices.

Stroboscope Makes Use of Household Objects

Now this is cool. Ever wanted to make your own form of zoopraxiscope with a more modern twist? Try making elabz’s Stroboscope. The hack uses an Arduino board and a spindle motor from an old DVD drive. While the CD with little dancing figures spins, an LED flashes, drawing attention to each figure and causing a motion effect. The instructions are available on the elabz website, but watch the Stroboscope working below. [via Hack A Day]

HTC HD2 Gets Ice Cream Sandwich

Those XDA Developers are at it again, returning their attention back to HTC HD2 smartphone. This time, the phone gets Ice Cream Sandwich, aka Android 4.0. The hack is quite impressive, and most of Ice Cream Sandwich’s features work on this phone, which isn’t bad going considering the HD2 is now two years old. Of course, the downside is it can be a bit laggy, and the camera, USB Mass Storange, and hardware acceleration features aren’t working just yet. If you want to get new software on your old phone, follow Tytung‘s instructions over on the XDA forum thread. [via Ubergizmo]

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